Tag Archives: studio

Second Saturday Artwalk . Casey Matthews Fine Art

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This next Saturday is the Second Saturday Artwalk. You are invited to an open house, June 10th from 5-8PM and see what I’ve been working on.
Casey Matthews Fine Art & Gallery Novus, 813 South 8th Street, Fernandina Beach, FL.
For more information call 904.556.1119 or visit http://www.caseymatthews.com
(Regular hours are by appointment)
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Filed under Art Events, Art Opening & Studio Tour, Gallery Related

Donating Artwork

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Casey Matthews “Containment Issues” (30×30) 2015

 

I recently donated THIS original painting to The Douglas Anderson Theater Department Boosters.  Douglas Anderson is an artsy magnet school (like FAME!) in Jacksonville, Florida.  The arts in schools enrich all human endeavors by bridging differences among people and teaching creative and critical thinking skills.  Apparently, these days, PE and band are considered electives in most public schools.  (No wonder the drop-out rate is so high!)  So if you like this painting and/or want to support art in schools (like I do!) this painting can be yours for only $1!  This painting is being raffled off instead put in their silent auction in an attempt to get more attention (and raise more money) outside of North East Florida.  You can buy a raffle ticket HERE, you can buy as many or a few as you like, and if you are not local it will be shipped to you free of charge – so go for it!

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I have had the best year of my career, and it has been amazing to be able to give back to a few worthwhile causes that are important to me.  Each year, I am inundated with requests to donate work for all sorts of causes/organizations, and unfortunately this year I have had to tell more people “no” than ever.  A few years ago, I decided that I really needed to have a clear mission/objective when donating artwork, and if the organization did not fall in a certain category – it was an easy “no” (which is easier said than done.) I have been put in an awkward situation (more than once) and could not articulate reasons why I did not think it was a good idea for to give a piece of work (not that I even need any) and I ended up fumbling my words and sounding like a complete ass-hole.  I now only donate to causes that are close to my heart, and/or are local – and I also put a monetary cap on the donations.  Once that is met, I’m done.  When I do donate something it is usually a new-ish painting that is representative of my current style. I normally donate work that is a decent size:  24×24 – 36×36, which is essentially $1000-$2000+ in value.  Why do I do that? I don’t know – I guess because my reputation is important to me (even if I do complain) – but if I give you some tiny painting then you won’t really make any money for your organization – and if I give you some older work, the painting might not sell, that would be fairly humiliating (no good deed goes unpunished.)  If I care enough to donate something I go all out.  More often than not, the people who are exposed to my work at these auctions – it is the only time they will ever see my work. Part of me wants to leave a good impression, while the other part of me realizes that it should not matter – because even if they proclaim to LOVE me/my work, they never seem to visit my studio, even for the casual monthly Art Walks.  Art auctions have bidders that are preconditioned to pay less than the fair market value  – and that does not do me any favors (or the galleries that represent me;) selling my work for much less than retail cheapens my business, and devalues my product.   Some people claim that “your donation, will be good exposure,” and “so many high-end collectors will be there” or “its a great form of advertising,” as it is displayed at their event; an event that you do not even get invited to.  Some people can even be so pushy or insulting when you say no – and those are the douche bags that ruin it for everyone.

So the purpose of this little vent is to help educate a little, so you know the philosophy behind donating artwork.  I have found that most artists are fairly generous, especially if you woo them throughout the year and let them how appreciative you are. Most artists love to have their ego stroked, and will respond to praise, year-long support, and thanks.  Remember, they are basically getting nothing from this – so try to sweeten the pot a little. If you ever want to request a donation from an artist, here are some suggestions to manipulate the situation to your benefit:

  1. Write your local State Representative and request a change in the current tax laws regarding donated artwork. Contrary to what most organizations believe, artists are not entitled to deduct a fair market value of the artwork they create and in turn donate. Most people who solicit art donations are unaware of this. Ask your friends, family members, and other people on the donation committee to do the same.  People have been trying to get these laws changed for years.  It is in your best interest to get them amended, so you will get more donations.
  2. Take the artist to lunch or coffee before you pick up the artwork. Artists like free stuff/food.  Pretend you are taking them on a date and you want to have sex later.  Except the “sex” is a $2000 painting.
  3. Take the time to explain your organization and cause.  Believe it or not, some private schools constantly ask for donations, but never really even state what the auction proceeds are specifically used for.  I mean, you are privately funded, can’t you just raise tuition to cover your needs?  Be specific.
  4. After your event, please provide the artist with an official thank you letter recognizing the art donation, the current market value, as well as the name of the purchaser, and final offering. Believe it or not, this is rarely given to the artist – if at all.  Artists like to know who their patrons are, so they can add them to their mailing list.
  5. Visit the artist in the studio or at an art opening at least once during the year to show support.  You will not be forced to buy anything – I promise. You can even help promote the artists events on social media throughout the year.  If you are nice and supportive to the artist, they will be nice to you in the long run.
  6.  Offer a free ticket(s) to your event, and be consistent about it.  Don’t offer tickets to your fancy gala a few years, then quit. You will quit getting art.
  7. Offer to split the proceeds with the artist. Or let the artist set the minimum bid and whatever the final offering is above that, you can keep.
  8. Publicly recognize the artist as a benefactor or patron throughout the year.
  9. Advertise or publicize the donated artwork on your website or social media prior to the auction, in order to garner support and attention.
  10. Consider asking for a donation in the spring or summer, even if your benefit is in the fall or winter.  Don’t ask too close to tax time, but don’t ask too late in the year when everyone else does.
  11. Don’t ask every year.  Artists can’t possibly donate to all the people/organizations that ask every year, and it is painful to have to say no all the time.  Space out your requests.

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Studio Mess : Creative Clutter

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I’m not exaggerating when I tell you this is as messy and crammed as my studio has ever been in the past 11 years  – and this is only ONE room (and this one is supposed to be the clean/gallery room.)  I have been super busy with some HUGE commissions. No time to clean.

I even got another commission last night – a huge installation to fill a 15’Wx11’H space.  I’m about ready to holla “last call” for Commissions before Christmas! Where did summer go?

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Filed under Studio Related, Uncategorized, Works in Progress

MoMA PS1 Studio Visit

Check me out on MoMA PS1 Studio Tours!

I had been meaning to do this for over a year. I took all the photos last year, but kept forgetting the building shot until last month. And on top of it I had to tweak my bio and artist statement so tight – majorly stripped down to fulfill the character count. Took off dates and everything (which is probably dumb, but who cares?)

And on top of it the website was having technical difficulty and this whole uploading process took over an hour! Anyway, done!

Here is something else I just finished.

Casey Matthews "You Turned On Me Like a Rabid Dog!" (48x60x3)

Casey Matthews “You Turned On Me Like a Rabid Dog!” (48x60x3)

 

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What is Art? Who knows?

Hindsight (36x36)

Part of one of the amazing things about having an art studio open to the public is that I can interact with people on a whole other level.  And believe me – this has not always been a welcomed act (on may part.) I’m sure I sound like a broken record on that subject.  I don’t exactly care for most people, I’m shy,  I’m not a people-pleaser, and I don’t seek validation from people to prove my self-worth (as an artist).  Oh, and I dread small talk.  Also, my bull shit tolerance level is very low…..I guess I could go on and on.  Those are not exactly the greatest qualities to possess, especially when you are trying to sell things.  (Ooooops) So having an open studio has helped me interact with people and learn to work around interruptions, and be more patient with people. I am generally a joyous person even though I make myself sound like a troll, just not a people person.

That being said, I met this older gentleman the other day.  He was very interested in hearing me explain my art – because I could tell that he could not understand it, or relate to it in the least bit.  Upon further conversation, I learned that he really did love art – but preferred more realistic, and especially enjoyed plein air.  He was so passionate when he was describing a certain piece of art he had in his possession – that he could tell that it was painted at several different times of day because of the light, etc.  He even managed to track down the exact small town where it was painted (and from what I remember, it was even in a different country.) I was completely impressed that he spent so many hours analyzing the painting.  Some people like things (art, music, movies) that remind them of a past experiences, past places, their youth, etc.  And he was defiantly one of those people (stuck in the past).   On the other hand – I enjoy art, and making art that makes me use my imagination, tap into my adventurous side, seems unpredictable, more progressive, and explores the unknown.  I am drawn to the mystery. This mirrors how I live and embrace life.

This gentleman went on to talk about his previous work life, (I think oil/geology related,) and  he was particularly interested in Fractals (Fractal Geometry – I think). He is obsessed with observing and predicting patterns in everything, and this is where my art frustrated him.  Because he is used to applying logic to everything in his life – and my work appeared illogical at first glance.  He could even apply Fractals to Jackson Pollocks work, and I attempted to understand his explanation.  (And BTW I’m waaay past sticking a bird in my otherwise non-objective painting art so some blow Joe logical left brainer can find something to relate to, and be OK and breathe easy the rest of the day) I simply explained that the outcome of my work meant absolutely nothing, and was non-objective, and intuitive.  That there was no need to over analyze it – that you are to enjoy it as “Art, for Art’s Sake.”  That the things I am inspired with absolutely have nothing do with a subject matter – or at least a subject that can be decoded by mere humans.  I am more inspired by energy, mood, and experimenting, and that I find my work very challenging, and that is my main priority. While, yes, my eventual goal is to sell my paintings and financially support myself,  I do not set about making a pretty picture that will match a sofa when I sit down at the easel.  The outcome is completely unrelated to the process. That my art is my therapy, and I am relaxed and clear when I work.  That the process is a grounding experience for me and it is the journey that is the most important.  Because it is mine, and mine alone.    The secret communication and intimacy that transpires is only mine to understand.  When I am finished – I will let you see,  I just don’t care or want you to understand.  I could make something up about how deep and meaningful my work is – but I hate to admit it – there really is nothing to explain.  My work is an extension of MY personality.  I am not a particularly deep or meaningful person. I’m a realist and don’t think I am a decidedly special, or exceptional human being.  Just average – and I’m OK with that.  I don’t care about politics,  I am straight-forward, at times rude, and superficial.  I am also passionate, focused, humorous, fun, and loving – and just don’t take things seriously or over-analyze things.  I’m just trying to fly below the radar, and trying to enjoy life before the world implodes.

Behind the EightBall (36×36)

How to define art has been a subject that has been debated by an infinite number of people since the dawn of human civilization. And there seems to be no definite solution to define such a simple subject.  But most will agree, that art is subjective and different in the eye of the beholder.  Art stimulates different parts of our brains and evokes emotion.  Art is a way to be creative and express ones self. For some people, art is the entire reason they get out of bed in the morning. And you might say that art is something that makes us more thoughtful and well-rounded humans.  It is amazing how different people from all walks of life can see, enjoy, experience, and perceive things completely differently.

But the fact that my art even evoked something in this man, was intriguing to me. You know the saying “The only thing worse than being talked about is NOT being talked about” – Oscar Wild.  I guess that is true – depending what lies are told.

He was very intelligent and knowledgeable about art – and I enjoyed talking with him – but he just did not care for non-objective abstract art, no matter how I tried to explain it to him.  And that was OK.  I enjoyed our conversation because I rarely think about what I am doing, let alone articulate what I am doing.  I realize I live in a little vacuum, and feel like a turtle most of the time; keeping to myself, and interacting very little. I forget that I need a little artist intellectual stimulation now and then.

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“Art Studio” in NYC

I recently took some photos of my apartment “art studio” (more like a work area) in NYC for an upcoming studio visit website (TBA).  I  had an upcoming art opening in SoHo and had more art in stock than usual, so I was able to “fluff up” the photo shoot and make it look good (pretty and productive.)  So I thought I would share with you.

This is what it looks like when I drop the disco ball, pull back the rug, then lay down the tarp, and get down to it while my man is at work:

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I have Northern exposure – so the room is constantly flooded with light (not the greatest photos – it was a cloudy day, but you get the idea)

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The view of the HighLine Park, and the Hudson River from 12 stories up.  The West Chelsea / Meat Packing area.

The apartment itself is 500 square feet, and when two people are there, one (ME) must to be more considerate than normal of the mess that is left around.  As an artist this is almost impossible unless you live with the (loving) slave driver that I do.

I keep all my supplies in my clothes closet when not in use.  (sorry I forgot to photograph that) I have a special tall skinny Elfa art cart that I purchased from the Container Store so it hardly takes up any space:

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And extra canvas is easily stored behind the sofa, and other exciting places:

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The kitchen counter and stove also serve as work space from time to time:

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I have all the art supplies I need, but find myself being more conservative with my paint (which I should anyway) than I do in my Florida studio. I would not say that the work is more controlled (so I don’t make too much of a mess) but it seem a little calmer; quiet.  But I like how these elements can reflect upon the work.

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In Florida I have about 350 square feet of studio space outside of my home – that is also open to the public 6 days a week even if I am not there. Half of that is used as gallery/display space, and the other half is my messy work area.  And during busy times, I keep the door closed (DO NOT DISTURB!) and use the whole place as a crazy art making factory.  From time to time, I complain that I need more space, but that is usually when I need to clean and organize.  Last year I went on a studio tour of Chelsea Artists and there were some studios the size of mine with 2-4 people crammed in there – AND they are 4 times as expensive!

So I need to remember and appreciate what I do have.

Continue checking out my website for new work.  I will be updating all weekend.

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Studio

Here are some shots I took with my iphone around my studio (some new work).  The quality is not that great, but you get the idea.  I also updated my website with a few new pieces.

 

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